Can An Ear Infection Cause Vertigo?

If you might have an infection and are feeling dizzy you may be wondering 'can an infection of the ear cause vertigo'. The answer to this question is 'yes'. This is usually the case if the infection is of your inner ear structures. Th is the part of the ear concerned with balance and detecting movement of the head. A viral infection here is often called labyrinthitis. It causes inflammation of the soft tissues in this area and alters the density of the fluid in the semicircular canals. These are the part of the inner ear which detect the movement of your head.

 Can An Ear Infection Cause Vertigo?

Can An Ear Infection Cause Vertigo?

This means that when you have this type of ear infection your inner ear is unable to measure accurately how far your head has moved. Your eyes, muscles and joints will be telling your brain something different to your inner ear. This results in the sensation of dizziness. The confusion which your brain experiences often leads to nausea and vomiting.

Sometimes labyrinthitis strikes out of the blue, but you may also be experiencing a cough, cold or sore throat. Your doctor may be able to prescribe medication which can help. It is probably worth trying some paracetamol and ibuprofen as well as a decongestant if your tubes are blocked up. Long-term dizziness is well treated by drugs such as Stemetil which is prescription only.

A condition called benign positional vertigo often is the cause of vertigo.  It causes a sensation of spinning round and is caused by damage to the sensory apparatus of the ear.  Tiny particles called otoliths usually detect movements of the head.  These can become detached and rattle around in their little space in the inner ear. People feel dizzy.  Ear specialists know a special procedure called Epley's Manoeuvre. This can move the tiny particles and relieve the symptoms.

If you are under the impression you may be affected by an ear problem then it is imperative that you visit your doctor for a checkup. This blog post is not to be treated as a substitute for medical advice.

Dr Toby Bateson writing for ZenPlugs.com